In September 2018, LPPI launched a rapid-response policy project to address California’s Latino physician crisis to increase the health and well-being of all Californians. The capacity of California’s health care workforce to meet the needs of all residents is a chief policy concern for state leaders, and LPPI’s interdisciplinary team of research scientists will provide compelling evidence to support policy reforms that integrate the needs of the state’s plurality. LPPI experts leading this project include Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, Professor of Medicine at the Geffen School of Medicine and Center for the Study of Latino Health & Culture; Dr. Arturo Vargas Bustamante, Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Fielding School of Public Health; and Dr. Matt A. Barreto, Professor of Chicana/o Studies and Political Science.

Featured

The Provider Prospective

Interview with Dr. David Hayes-Bautista on California’s Latino Physician Crisis

Policy Briefing on California’s Latino Physician Crisis

Featured Reports

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Social Media Toolkit

CA Language Concordance Mismatch

5 Centuries to Reach Parity

The Current State of the Latino Physician Workforce

Press Release

Read full AltaMed press release here.

Media Coverage

Media Coverage on LPPI Health Policy

California Health Report, California Must Address a Statewide Latino Physician Shortage, (February 12, 2019): “According to research from the UCLA Latino Policy & Politics Initiative, Latinos represent over 40 percent of California’s population but make up less than 12 percent of graduating physicians from the state’s medical schools. At the current rate, it will take 500 years to reach a point where the number of Latino physicians is proportional to the number of Latino patients.”

Medical Press, ACA reduced disparities in health care between Mexican-heritage Latinos and other Latinos, (September 4, 2018): “According to lead author Arturo Vargas Bustamante, associate professor of health policy and management in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, ‘Our study shows that even though undocumented immigrants were excluded from the Affordable Care Act nationally, in California undocumented Latinos reported marginal increases in health insurance coverage and usual source of care, perhaps because of the specific policies implemented at the state or local level.'”

Mundo Hispanico, Indocumentados en California se beneficiaron con “Obamacare” revela estudio, (September 4, 2018): “Researchers from the UCLA Latino Policy and Politics Initiative analyzed California census data in a study released earlier this month to gather evidence and develop policy solutions to address the shortage of Spanish-speaking physicians in California.”

La Opinion, Obamacare mejoró acceso a salud de todos los latinos En California ayudó incluso a los indocumentados a tener más acceso a salud, (September 4, 2018): “‘La cobertura médica aumentó tanto entre documentados como entre indocumentados, pero estos últimos siguen teniendo menos acceso a seguro’, dijo Arturo Vargas Bustamante, el principal investigador y profesor asociado de política de salud en la Escuela Fielding de Salud Pública de UCLA.”

The Daily Bruin, LPPI study recommends med school students study underrepresented languages, (September 28, 2018): “A pesar de estar excluidos de la Ley de Cuidado de Salud Costeable (ACA), conocida como “Obamacare”, los inmigrantes indocumentados que residen en California se han beneficiado indirectamente de esta medida, según un estudio publicado hoy por la Universidad de California Los Ángeles (UCLA).”

Relevant Research from LPPI Policy Experts

Dr. Paul Hsu, Health Affairs (September 2018)

The historical narrative on diversity, race, and health would predict that California’s population change from 22 percent racial/ethnic minority in 1970 to 62 percent in 2016 would lead to a massive health crisis with high mortality rates, low life expectancy, and high infant mortality rates—particularly given the state’s high rates of negative social determinants of health: poverty, high school incompletion, and uninsurance.

Dr. Arturo Vargas Bustamante, Health Affairs (September 2018)

According to lead author Arturo Vargas Bustamante, associate professor of health policy and management in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, “Our study shows that even though undocumented immigrants were excluded from the Affordable Care Act nationally, in California undocumented Latinos reported marginal increases in health insurance coverage and usual source of care, perhaps because of the specific policies implemented at the state or local level.”

Dr. Michelle Bholat, Modern Healthcare (September 2018)

Dr. Michelle Bholat, executive director of the International Medical Graduate Program at UCLA, speaks on the efforts undertaken by the program to address the language disparity between medical professionals and the under served Latino community.

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